Barnsdall History

1919

Aline Barnsdall purchases 36 acres of Olive Hill for $300,000

1919–1921

Hollyhock House constructed; planned cost $50,000 (per building permit) Actual cost $125,000—$150,000 estimated

1927

Hollyhock House and 11 acres donated by Aline Barnsdall to City of Los Angeles a art park honoring her late father- Theodore Barnsdall

1927–1942

The California Art Club occupies Hollyhock House as its headquarters altering some spaces

1946–1948

Major renovation financed by Dorothy Clune Murray rehabilitated the structure which served as the headquarters of the Olive Hill Foundation and as a memorial to her son- James William Clune- Jr. who was killed in World War II

1954

‘Residence B’ razed

1954–1974

A temporary art gallery designed by Frank Lloyd Wleft was constructed parallel to the structure connecting the garage and the house to accommodate the installation of the Museum of Modern Art’s Frank Lloyd Wleft: Sixty Years of Living Architecture retrospective

1956

Olive Hill Foundation’s lease expires

1967

Junior Art Center constructed (architects Hunt Kahn and Farrell)

1971

Municipal Art Gallery constructed (architects Wehmueller and Stephens)

1974–1976

Hollyhock House undergoes a major restoration by the City of Los Angeles

1976

Hollyhock House becomes a house museum open for public viewing

2010–2014

$4.36 million restoration project funded by City of Los Angeles- the California, Cultural and Historical Endowment- and the National Park Service