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Captions

Top Image:

 

Untitled

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

 

Image Slider Above (left to right):

 

Mirror Pull 2

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

 

Mirror Pull 3

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

 

Mirror Pull 4

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

Captions

Image Slider Above (left to right):

 

Untitled

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

 

Untitled

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

 

Untitled

mixed media

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist.

Click the circle button below for the ADA Accessibility Experience materials.

Interview with Edgar Arceneaux, C.O.L.A. 2021 Visual Art Fellow

ADA Accessibility Experience

 

 

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Read the Audio Transcript

Edgar Arceneaux reveals the ideas and inspirations behind the making of his new body work. The series of abstracted paintings, with various hairline fractures, skin-like textures and other breaks charged by the artist’s emotional energy, are part of Arceneaux’s ongoing interest in exploring the intersection of materials, metaphors, and ideas.

 

Recounting the influence and relationships with his family, Arceneaux describes his continued interest in using mirrors as material to explore the gaps in history and memories. Mirror Pull draws upon the artist’s own emotional, mental and physical states—refracted through a process involving the physical separation of the silver from the glass of mirrors. By playing with the ideas and material aspects associated with mirrors, Arceneaux asks viewers to consider what is carried forward as self, as family, and “what it says about us in the physical world.”

 

Edgar Arceneaux (b. 1972, Los Angeles, California, he/him) works in drawing, sculpture and performance to explore connections between historical events and present-day truths. He investigates historical patterns through drawings, installations, and theater events, such as the play Until, Until, Until… which reenacts Ben Vereen’s tragically misunderstood blackface performance at Ronald Reagan’s 1981 Inaugural Gala. His work has been featured at the Hammer Museum, the Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, the Studio Museum, Performa 15, and the MIT List Visual Arts Center, among others. Arceneaux is an Associate Professor of Art for Roski School of Art and Design at USC.