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Top Image:

 

The Women

unique chromogenic photograph

25 x 60 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

 

Image Slider Above (left to right):

 

Paulette

unique chromogenic photograph

24 x 15 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

 

Suzanne

unique chromogenic photograph

24 x 13.5 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

 

Dora

unique chromogenic photograph

24 x 17 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

Captions

Image Slider Above (left to right):

 

Frida

unique chromogenic photograph

24 x 13.75 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

 

Lee

unique chromogenic photograph

24 x 12.75 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

 

Ida

unique chromogenic photograph

24 x 13 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

 

Claude 2

unique chromogenic photograph

24.75 x 13.75 inches

2020

courtesy of the artist and Diane Rosenstein Gallery.

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Interview with Farrah Karapetian, C.O.L.A. 2021 Visual Art Fellow

ADA Accessibility Experience

 

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Farrah Karapetian reveals the ideas and inspirations behind the making of her latest work. The project, with layers of history, questions and processes, is part of the artist’s ongoing interest in the relational structure of subjects, viewers, and authors. 

 

Recounting the process of this new work, Karapetian describes her interest in this particular group of women Surrealist, Pan African and Anti Fascist thinkers from Paris and Martinque,  who have been largely ignored by academia and creative communities until now. To re-embody this collective of primary characters, Karapetian dives deep into exploring their lives—from what they wore, their domestic spaces, how they communicated—as part of a “world building” process that also includes photograms and a collaborative script. By reembodying and renovating this constellation of historical figures, Karpetian presents a contemporary image that can spark emotive effects for viewers and questions of “what does it remind you of in terms of your own family’s photographs.” 

 

Farrah Karapetian (b. 1978, Marin, California, she/her) incorporates sculptural and performative means of achieving imagery that refigures the medium of photography around bodily experience. Karapetian’s work has been exhibited at Performa, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, MOCA Jacksonville, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, George Eastman Museum, the Houston Center for Photography, and SFMOMA, among others. Her work is in public collections that include the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco. Karapetian is a professor at the visual arts program at the University of San Diego.