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First Image Slider (left to right):

 

The Sun Burns My Eyes Like Moons

cyanotype from painted negative on paper (hung on wall), negative, ink and acrylic on Duralar (on floor)

10 feet x 25 feet each

2021

courtesy of the artist.

photo: Garret Hill

 

The Sun Burns My Eyes Like Moons 

studio installation view

cyanotype from painted negative on paper (hung on wall), negative, ink and acrylic on Duralar (on floor)

10 feet x 25 feet each

2021

courtesy of the artist.

photo: Garret Hill

 

Second Image Slider (left to right):

 

The Sun Burns My Eyes Like Moons (details)

cyanotype from painted negative on paper (hung on wall), negative, ink and acrylic on Duralar (on floor)

10 feet x 25 feet each

2021

courtesy of the artist.

Caption

The Sun Burns My Eyes Like Moons (Prototype)

cyanotype from painted negative with ink and acrylic on paper

45 x 76 inches

2021

courtesy of the artist.

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Interview with Lia Halloran, C.O.L.A. 2021 Visual Art Fellow

ADA Accessibility Experience

 

 

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Lia Halloran’s largest work to date, The Sun Burns My Eyes Like Moons, with its layering and processes of cyanotype, photographic negatives and positives, and various mark making, speaks to the artist’s ongoing interest in bringing scientific concepts, inventions, and experiences into a contemporary art setting. 

 

Halloran describes her interest and research into the archives of Mount Wilson Observatory—where some of the foundational understandings of the sun was first discovered—, and where she learned about Emory Hale, who founded the solar telescope. Halloran incorporates these found images in various details throughout the final piece, as well as the use of color vis-à-vis the rich, luminous blue of the cyanotype and light absorption of the Black 3.0 paint, to evoke a sense of deep space in the sky experienced in solar events such as an eclipse. With its consuming scale, material exploration and spirit of discovery, Halloran expands notions of time and space to create a “temple to the sun.”

 

Lia Halloran’s (b. 1977, Chicago, Illinois, she/her) work makes use of scientific concepts as a starting point and explores how perception, time and scale inform the human desire to understand the world and our emotional and psychological place within it. Solo exhibitions have been held at DCKT Contemporary, Martha Otero Gallery, Hilger NEXT, Fredric Snitzer Gallery, LaMontagne Gallery and Sandroni Rey. Lia Halloran serves as Associate Professor of Art as the Director of the Painting and Drawing Department at Chapman University in Orange, CA, where she teaches painting as well as courses that explore the intersection of art and science.