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Image Slider (left to right):

 

Las Tortillas featuring Arturo “The Van Guard” Ochoa cutout and CLASS: C mobile gallery

former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space and bronze, 1985 Chevy, bronze

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Las Tortillas and CLASS: C mobile gallery

former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space and bronze, 1985 Chevy, bronze

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Las Tortillas

bronze

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Las Tortillas and CLASS: C mobile gallery

former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space and bronze, 1985 Chevy, bronze

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

Captions

Image Slider (left to right):

 

Las Tortillas

bronze

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Las Tortillas

bronze

3 x 6 x 6 inches

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Las Tortillas

bronze

dimensions variable

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

Captions

Image Slider Above (left to right):

 

CLASS: C 

Office View

Former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space 1985 Chevy

Full Ton 1985 Chevy Cargo Van

2001–2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Ruben Ochoa

 

Un Paquete 

Office Installation View

bronze, bolsa, and twisty tie

2 ½ x 5 ¾ x 5 ¾ inches

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Un Paquete 

Office Installation View

bronze, bolsa, and twisty tie

2 ½ x 5 ¾ x 5 ¾ inches

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Un Paquete 

Office Installation View

bronze, bolsa, and twisty tie

2 ½ x 5 ¾ x 5 ¾ inches

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Ruben Ochoa

 

Un Paquete 

Office Installation View

bronze, bolsa, and twisty tie

2 ½ x 5 ¾ x 5 ¾ inches

2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

Captions

Image Slider Above (left to right):

 

CLASS: C

Storage View

Former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space 1985 Chevy

Full Ton 1985 Chevy Cargo Van

2001–2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Ruben Ochoa

 

CLASS: C

Storage View

Former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space 1985 Chevy

Full Ton 1985 Chevy Cargo Van

2001–2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

CLASS: C

Storage View

Former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space 1985 Chevy

Full Ton 1985 Chevy Cargo Van

2001–2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Pete Galindo

 

Bottom Image:

 

CLASS: C

Former Ochoa Family Tortilla Delivery Van/ mobile gallery space

Full Ton 1985 Chevy Cargo Van

2001–2021

courtesy of the artist and CLASS: C.

photo: Ruben Ochoa

Click the circle button below for the ADA Accessibility Experience materials.

Interview with Ruben Ochoa, C.O.L.A. 2021 Visual Art Fellow

ADA Accessibility Experience

 

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Ruben Ochoa continues his interest in crossing disciplines of sculpture, installation and photography for his latest work. Initially created in 2001, Ochoa describes how CLASS: C was a way for him to bridge both his family’s business of selling tortillas out of the back of a 1985 Chevy van to his own personal experiences as an artist of color in traditionally exclusionary exhibition styles. 

 

In its initial run, Ochoa invited other artists of color to showcase their work as part of CLASS: C. But to coincide with the twentieth  anniversary, for the first time, Ochoa is featuring his own work in the form of stacks of bronze tortillas. By revisiting CLASS: C today—as a way to honor his family, the invisible labor of street food vendors and other businesses, and reflect on his creative practice—,Ochoa guides viewers to experience the literal and figural weight of an everyday food staple. 

 

Ruben Ochoa’s (b. 1974, Oceanside, CA, he/him) practice engages space as both a concept and a material.  Often produced with material forms associated with construction, Ochoa’s works expose the ideological and broader sociopolitical and economic relationships that facilitate the way spaces we inhabit and move through are assembled. His work has been the subject of various solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, and Site Santa Fe, amongst others. He received his BFA from Otis College of Art and Design and his MFA from UC Irvine. Ochoa is a professor at Roski School of Art and Design at USC.