About

Opportunities

Submission Guidelines

Contact Us

FAQs

REVISIONING

ARCHIVE MACHINES brings together recent works by Southern California artists that examine the archive as a conceptual vehicle to de-center singular narratives and encourage plural perspectives through the activities of revisioning, resisting, rewiring and relating. 

 

The artists in the REVISIONING section press us to rethink our relationships to the past by questioning modes in which we receive, process, share and engage with information and histories. They then invite us to break from paradigms and consider multiple points of view by re-interpreting and re-presenting their primary sources. 

 

Artists Allison Stewart, Rachel Zaretsky and Caroline Clerc dislodge the static nature of monuments by revealing the velocities of activities, movements, and currents of life that contend with any fixed meaning of “monumentality.” Artists Jamie Adams, Danny Jauregui, Lenard Smith and Audrey Leshay’s artworks challenge habitual connotations by juxtaposing objects, images, and text in order to reorient meanings and present alternative associations. Last, the art of Maura Murnane, Natalie Delgadillo and Dina Kelberman calls on viewers to contemplate indexical ordering and collecting practices, reminding their audiences of the subjectivities that lie behind systems and records.

 

Please take our Visitor Experience Survey

Allison Stewart

In this color photograph by Allison Stewart, a concrete base with black and pink graffiti stands in the middle of a circular, grass area with a cloudy sky overhead. In the background of the photograph are trees and a yellow school bus to the right. In the foreground is a stone fragment with black graffiti and a concrete pathway. The monument that was removed was the Jefferson Davis monument located in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Artist Statement

“The United States has over 1,700 Confederate monuments in public spaces across the nation. The majority of Confederate monuments were donated by the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) during the Jim Crow era and again during the Civil Rights era, with donations peaking in 1890-1920 and 1950-1965. The UDC created the “Lost Cause” propaganda machine, erecting monuments at every site they could locate in the United States and regulating curriculum and history books in schools and libraries. These monuments do not teach us the history of the Civil War; they teach us the history of white supremacy.” 

1. Removed Jefferson Davis monument New Orleans, Louisiana. Donated by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Installed 1911, Removed 2017, archival pigment print, 24 x 36 inches, 2019. courtesy of the artist

Read More

“The dedication event was a ‘Whites Only’ ceremony that included children dressed in red, white, and blue, creating a Confederate living battle flag and singing Dixie. The dedication date corresponds with the 50th anniversary of the inauguration of Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederate States of America.”

— Allison Stewart

2. Removed Albert Sidney Johnston monument, University of Texas, Austin Texas. Commissioned and donated by University of Texas regent George W. Littlefield. Installed at University of Texas Littlefield Fountain 1919, Moved to the South Mall 1933, Removed 2017,  archival pigment print, 24 x 36 inches, 2018.  courtesy of the artist

Read More

“UT’s president had the four statues that lined the South Mall removed after Charlottesville made it clear ‘Confederate monuments have become symbols of modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism.’”

— Allison Stewart

3. Lee Circle, New Orleans, Louisiana, Donated by The Robert E. Lee Monument Association, Installed 1884, Removed 2017, archival pigment print, 24 x 36 inches, 2019.  courtesy of the artist

Read More

“Lee was against building monuments to him and the confederacy, stating in a letter to the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association. ‘I think it wiser, moreover, not to keep open the sores of war but to follow the examples of those nations who endeavored to obliterate the marks of civil strife, to commit to oblivion the feelings engendered.’ The Robert E. Lee Monument Association was formed after Lee’s death in 1870 and is still in operation.”

— Allison Stewart

Biography

Allison Stewart grew up in Houston, Texas, and currently lives in Los Angeles, CA. Stewart travels the United States exploring the construction of American identity through its relics, rituals, and mythologies. Her work has been published, and exhibited internationally and is included in public and private collections. Stewart received her MFA in Photography from California State University Long Beach and her BFA in Painting with a minor in Art History from the University of Houston.

Rachel Zaretsky

In this still from a video by Rachel Zaretsky, the artist is seen in the center of the image wearing a black shirt with a white background. The artist is looking at a smart phone in their left hand and holding their right arm and hand in the air. The artist reads from their phone and says, the arm appears small and far away.

Artist Statement

“The Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach is the first memorial that I had a relationship to, as the names of my family members are inscribed in the memorial’s walls. The idea for my performance originated from a questioning of where the act of remembering is located. I decided rather than visit the memorial in person, I will visit through Instagram geotags and hashtags. In the video, I withhold imagery of both the site and the social media posts. I instead use language and my arm as a prop to represent the memorial and the social media performativity as the site through embodied gesture.”

1. Visiting the Holocaust Memorial Miami Beach by proxy, video, 10:58, 2019. courtesy of the artist

 

ADA Accessibility Experience

Biography

Rachel Zaretsky is a Los Angeles based artist who uses performance, video, and photography to challenge our relationship to the creation of memories. She studies the compulsion to collect and create personal archives of digital images and treats them as malleable material. Zaretsky’s inquiry-based art practice examines how modes of representation can portray absence, how we process loss, and our desire to preserve through memorialization. Zaretsky holds a BFA from The School of Visual Arts in New York and is currently an MFA candidate at the University of Southern California.

Caroline Clerc

This is a photograph of a sculptural installation by Caroline Clerc. This installation consists of flat materials, photographs and cut styrofoam that are stacked and layered into a structure resembling a mountain. At the top right point it is a photograph of nature details that are followed by cut outs of white boards. Towards the bottom of the structure are various sized cardboard pieces supporting the white board platforms. In the forefront of the image is large piece of styrofoam laying flat on the floor with a standing piece of brown cardboard leaning against the left wall.

Artist Statement

Mountains is a photographic series of weekly impermanent sculptures built by using archives of past photographic work and discarded materials. Made while shelter-in-place closures were in effect, this work begins with the memory of mountain forms; materials are piled, balanced, and photographed. At the point of their collapse, the process of building out to the expanse of my small studio repeats. Constrained by the physical dimensions of this space, the walls function as supports and determine the mountain’s boundaries. This cycle of reprocessing is realized for the web as an endless GIF loop.”

1. Mountains, animated GIF, 00:15, 2020.  courtesy of the artist

2. Third Mountain, archival inkjet print, 24 x 21 inches, 2020. courtesy of the artist

3. Second Mountain, archival inkjet print, 24 x 21 inches, 2020. courtesy of the artist

Biography

Caroline Clerc is a Los Angeles based artist. Her work explores the landscape as a complex site of recognition and cultural construction. Clerc received a BA in Fine Art and Art History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, a MA in Interdisciplinary Studies in the Arts from San Francisco State University, and a MFA in Visual Arts from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has had solo exhibitions at PØST, Elephant, Caetani Cultural Centre in British Columbia, Canada and most recently at Cerritos College Art Gallery.

Learn more about the RESPOND prompts

We welcome you to respond to any/all of the questions posed on this page and be a part of the exhibition. To have your comment added to this section of the website, please email dca-lamagresponse@lacity.org. In your email, indicate which question your comment pertains to. Additionally, if you would like to have your name or initials associated with the comment, please indicate in your email. If this is not indicated, we will assume you would like to have your comment attributed as “Anonymous”.

 

Please note our team will review and may edit responses before posting on the website for graphic content and length. We encourage you to keep comments as succinct as possible (e.g. 50-100 words max).

 

We will post comments to this section of the website within two (2) weeks of submission.

Jamie Adams

This image of an oil painting by Jamie Adams depicts a book titled Personal Adjustment. The text color is white with a yellow subtitle that reads The Psycology of Everyday Life. The book's cover features an image of two figures sitting with a green ivy wall behind them. The book is placed in the center of the image and is set against a red, organge and purple gradient background.

Artist Statement

“Book covers are designed to entice and draw the viewer into the intimacy of reading. The act of painting a book as an isolated still life object alters and heightens a disconnect with the original ‘reading’ of the book’s exterior. Ideas and suggestions that aren’t always apparent in the actual object become highlighted in its painted depiction.”

1. Personal Adjustment, oil on MDF panel, 16 x 20 x 1 inches, 2020. courtesy of the artist
2. Universe, oil on MDF panel, 16 x 20 x 1 inches, 2020. courtesy of the artist
3. The Sociology of Social Problems, oil on MDF panel, 16 x 20 x 1 inches, 2020. courtesy of the artist

Biography

Jamie Adams is an artist living in Los Angeles. Adams was born in Summit, New Jersey, and lived in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Boston and New York City before settling in Los Angeles in the late 1990’s. From his childhood onward, art making became a way for Jamie to try to make some kind of sense out of the world he found himself in. It is an ongoing project. Adams received an BA and MFA in Painting from Boston University, Boston, MA.

Danny Jauregui

This still image from an animated GIF by Danny Jauregui features an opened book. The pages are white with black text. The text is comprised of Los Angeles street names and areas. Some of the lines of text on the left page are striked out with a red marker; on the upper left margin of this page are the words Tool Shed. The artist's finger is also visible at the bottom of the left page.

Artist Statement

My artwork consists of photographs, animations, and paintings that explore queer space and ephemera. In these works, I often use historical records found in archives to articulate portraits of these fleeting and threatened locations. Bathhouses, gay bars, and public restrooms used for anonymous sex form the primary subjects of my work. I focus on these sites to mine their history and pay homage to the centrality of these spaces in helping queer people engage in new forms of worldmaking, community building, and identity transgressing.”

1. Damron (erased) – excerpt, GIF, 8 x 5 inches, 2018.  courtesy of the artist

Read More

“For “Damron (erased)”, I layered and animated images of Bob Damron’s “The Address Book”, a secret gay guidebook created by Damron in 1965 that listed gay bars, sex clubs, and cruising spots. The images were shot at USC’s ONE Archives and feature the Los Angeles section of the address book. The animation takes as inspiration the marginalia that was added by the original owner of the book. When a bar or club was no longer in operation, the owner of the book took a red marker and crossed out the name of the business. That line serves as the device used to make the animation, only this time the line is digital, and literally “erases” the page, revealing a new page with a new address below it. In this way, the line that erases and typically signifies closure, here is reversed, revealing a new set of addresses that resist erasure.”

– Danny Jauregui

2. Watchqueen (Gan) – excerpt, GIF, 6 x 5 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist

Read More

“This is a video animation that uses artificial intelligence (AI) trained on maps created in 1965 by sociologist Laud Humphreys that document cruising patterns created by men engaged in public sex. I trained the AI system to learn the structure of the maps and generate new invented maps, containing new cruising patterns that don’t actually exist. What you see here is an excerpt of what the AI generated. In his maps, Humphreys attempted to understand the dynamics involved when men seek sex in semi-public spaces. My interest is in the documentation of bodies and movement which I consider a form of “queer mark-making”, that is, ephemeral and performative marks in space that are fleeting and invisible to those outside of the sphere of public cruising culture. Because AI is prone to mistakes, it generates glitches that appear as abstract artifacts. These “errors” are embraced and exalted as data visualizations of the invisible queer marks that Humphrey inadvertently captured.”

– Danny Jauregui

3. Watchqueen (map), digital photo, 15 x 8 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist

Read More

I photographed a series of digitally created maps that plot the sexual activity of men in public restrooms. Sociologist Laud Humphrey created the maps for his 1965 book “Tearoom Trade” which sought to explain the covert world of anonymous public sex. I discovered the maps at ONE-National Gay and Lesbian Archives and re-created them using 3D animation software. I rendered them to look like abandoned ruins and then photographed the results. The photographs visualize the fleeting patterns created by the men’s movements thereby paying homage to this form of queer mark-making.”

– Danny Jauregui

Biography

Danny Jauregui was born and raised in Los Angeles by Mexican immigrant parents. His artwork consists of paintings, photographs, and animations that explore the history of queer space. In 2005, he attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine and received his MFA from UCSD in 2006. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in such venues as MCASD, LACMA, Bowdoin Museum, The Power Plant in Canada, and the Samuel Freeman Gallery in LA. In 2010 he was a recipient of the CCF’s Los Angeles Emerging Artist Fellowship and currently teaches art at Whittier College.

Lenard Smith

Artist Statement

“Drawn to assemblage sculpture, I make photographic compositions of objects that address the complexities of the banal. Exploring a variety of formal art practices, mainly sculpture, I peruse my surroundings to identify what will exist in each arrangement. Often, this results in a juxtaposition of the traditional principles and elements of art against my attempts to create various depths, literal and figurative, within an image. Balancing the personal object with lonely, found objects is one of the ways I transform their place in a hierarchy.”

1. After Ye Must Be Born Again, archival pigment print, 30 x 40 inches, 2019.  courtesy of the artist
2. His Name Is Kofi, archival pigment print, 20 x 24 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist
3. New Movements, archival pigment print, 16 x 20 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist

Biography

Lenard Smith is a California native, an African American, and an emerging interdisciplinary artist primarily working with photography. He lives and works in Los Angeles, California. Smith received his Master of Fine Arts Degree in Advanced Photographic Studies from Bard College, New York.

 

Smith’s interest in artist books has led him to working as a self-publisher and with independent publishing houses to produce limited editions that have been available at The New Museum (New York), Printed Matter (New York), Dashwood Books (New York), and The Hammer Museum (Los Angeles).

Audrey Leshay

This is an image of an oil painting by Audrey Leshay. In this image, there are three figures, each depicting St. Cecilia, painted in shades of blue set against a night sky background. Each of the figures depicting St. Cecilia are in various stages of movement with a cloth hiding their face. The first figure (starting clockwise) sits with a record player, gestering the dropping of the needle. The second figure is dancing with their arms above their head, and the third figure is laying down on their side.

Artist Statement

BBC Jesus incorporates a digital reconstruction of the average man in first century Jerusalem onto the veil of Veronica as an attempt to create an apocryphal document that places his historical self into our memorials. St. Cecilia has an incorrupt body; never decomposing. She is our patron saint of music because her screams through torture are remembered as singing. As music develops, her immortal soul learns to use a record player. In St Cecilia Trinity, the record skips. She is familiar with this feeling of remaining constant in one moment and she dances forever to that tune.”

1. St Cecilia Trinity, oil on canvas, 72 x 60 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist

2. BBC Jesus, oil on canvas, 72 x 60 inches, 2019.  courtesy of the artist

Biography

Audrey Leshay is a painter and art teacher based in Los Angeles whose work surrounds the idea of time travel brought about by religious and astronomical histories. Leshay recently graduated from UCLA with a BA in Fine Art.

Learn more about the RESPOND prompts

We welcome you to respond to any/all of the questions posed on this page and be a part of the exhibition. To have your comment added to this section of the website, please email dca-lamagresponse@lacity.org. In your email, indicate which question your comment pertains to. Additionally, if you would like to have your name or initials associated with the comment, please indicate in your email. If this is not indicated, we will assume you would like to have your comment attributed as “Anonymous”.

 

Please note our team will review and may edit responses before posting on the website for graphic content and length. We encourage you to keep comments as succinct as possible (e.g. 50-100 words max).

 

We will post comments to this section of the website within two (2) weeks of submission.

Maura Murnane

In this digital image by Maura Murnane, there are six rows of various objects taken from the page of a 1990s consumer catalog. The depiction of these objects are set against a green gradient background.

Artist Statement

“For those lucky enough to be able to self-quarantine, the present is dominated by the virtual — encountering layers upon layers of constructed images. These artworks rework pages from a 1990s consumer catalog as a kind of visual hoarding, in a worshipful treatment of now-worthless commodities. Originally, they depicted arrays of products for selection from warehouses, in an earlier version of shopping now done online — a reminder of the material infrastructure still behind the virtual interaction. The result is an archive of desire, of dubious and diminished value, but haunted by the real.”

1. Religious Jewelry, digital image, 8.375 x 11.94 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist
2. Miscellaneous, digital image, 8.375 x 11.94 inches, 2020.  courtesy of the artist

Biography

Born and raised in a western enclave in Saudi Arabia, Maura Murnane works around themes of iconoclasm and desire through commercial imagery. She is currently a visiting lecturer in digital art at Scripps College. Murnane received her MFA from University of California, Irvine in Studio Art 2017 and her BFA in Design with honors from the University of Texas at Austin in 2006.

Natalie Delgadillo

This is an image of a drawing by Natalie Delgadillo which consists of handwriting that reference female archetypes in film and television, such as Disney and other animated cartoon programs. In the center of the artwork is Ariel 1989 written in a teal color. Surrounding that text are phrases written in a thin black marker placed everywhere on the white paper.

Artist Statement

“My work is about rabid dogs that are still nice even though they have rabies which defended me from Aristobrats that teased me within’ snitches. I like stinky feet which made me and my family laugh our tummies out like hyenas. My work is about storytelling, Ariel the world’s smartest mermaid however smarter than Sherlock Holmes, Albert Einstein, & Bill Nye The Science Guy and adventures of Space Mountain during Meet The Feebles movie in 1989 when Kermit The Frog went to outer space until he got lots of pimples during Christmas Day. Ariel is my favorite because I AM ARIEL.”

1. Untitled II (Ariel1989), marker on paper, 8 x 11 inches, 2019.  courtesy of ECF Art Centers

2. Untitled (CPR), marker and colored pencil on paper, 11 x 17 inches, 2019.  courtesy of ECF Art Centers

3. Untitled III (Ariel1989’s), marker on paper, 8 x 19 inches, 2019.  courtesy of ECF Art Centers

Biography

Working primarily in digital collage, video animation and drawing, Natalie Delgadillo explores human desire via female archetypes in film and television. Delgadillo’s affinities and sources range from Disney films, to 1980’s horror films and musicals. The indexical compositions present text and illustrations utilizing the language of movie credits often citing copyrights, directors, writers, and titles juxtaposed with illustrated protagonists.

Dina Kelberman

This is a still of a website-based work by Dina Kelberman. In this still image, there are seven rows of three images per row. Each image has a different brightly colored and unspecified objects. The colors range from bright orange, yellow, cobalt blue, green, pink and purple.

Artist Statement

“My work is about how everyone and everything is special, and so while specialness is not special, it is still pretty much the most exciting thing going. Much of my work comes out of my tendency to spend hours collecting and organizing imagery from the internet, television, and other surroundings of my everyday life. I like to elevate the familiar and transform moments into infinite stretches of time. In close examination of the seemingly insignificant, the viewer may bring their own limitless associations. Sometimes I think intentionality is the opposite of truth but then again that’s art.”

Disclaimer: By clicking the links below, you are leaving lamag.org and are going to a website that is not operated by the City of Los Angeles. The Department of Cultural Affairs is not responsible for maintaining content on linked sites.

 

https://dinakelberman.tumblr.com/

 

https://dinakelberman.com/smokeandfire/

1. I’m Google, website, found images and videos manually arranged, 2011 – ongoing.  courtesy of the artist

2. Smoke & Fire (video iteration 1), arranged loops made from cartoons, 2013 – ongoing.  courtesy of the artist

Biography

Dina Kelberman is a multimedia artist recently transplanted from Baltimore, MD to Los Angeles, CA. Kelberman has created original web-based pieces for The New Museum and The Marina Abramovic Institute and has been included in numerous international design and photography biennials. Her work has been written about in The New York Times, Art21 and NPR, and in Known and Strange Things (Cole, 2016) and Wasting Time on the Internet (Goldsmith, 2016). Recent invitations include the UbuWeb conference in Athens and the Post-Photography Prototyping Biennial in London.

Learn more about the RESPOND prompts

We welcome you to respond to any/all of the questions posed on this page and be a part of the exhibition. To have your comment added to this section of the website, please email dca-lamagresponse@lacity.org. In your email, indicate which question your comment pertains to. Additionally, if you would like to have your name or initials associated with the comment, please indicate in your email. If this is not indicated, we will assume you would like to have your comment attributed as “Anonymous”.

 

Please note our team will review and may edit responses before posting on the website for graphic content and length. We encourage you to keep comments as succinct as possible (e.g. 50-100 words max).

 

We will post comments to this section of the website within two (2) weeks of submission.